Teen Book Review: How to Catch a Bogle

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How to Catch a Bogle is a novel by Catherine Jinks, set in Victorian London. The protagonist Birdie McAdams is an apprentice to a Bogler named Alfred Bunce. A Bogler is someone who hunts and kills Bogles, which are child-eating demons that live in chimneys, sewers, and other dark places. Together, Birdie and Mr. Bunce rid London of the nefarious creatures. How to Catch a Bogle is the first installment in a trilogy, and it’s quite an interesting book. The downside of this book is the large cast of characters, which makes it a bit hard to follow. Overall, I thought the storyline was good, and it involved many twists and turns. I’d rate it a 4 out of 5 stars.

-Lucy

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Teen Book Review: Seeing Red

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Seeing Red by Kathryn Erskine is about 12 year-old Red Porter living in Stony Gap, Virginia. He loves working in his father’s garage and playing with his best friend Thomas. But his father dies of a heart attack, and Red’s life is turned upside down. Red’s mother can’t take it and tries to sell the house and move to Ohio. Red becomes friends with people who are against African Americans, and tests Thomas and Red’s friendship to the brink. This book is interesting, unlike any other YA book I’ve read because it examines the discrimination and racial segregation occurring in the 60’s. This book is completely unique, but the author stretches the plot a bit far. I would, however, recommend this book for reading.

-Gautam

 

Teen Book Review: If I Ever Get Out of Here

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If I Ever Get Out of Here by Eric Gansworth is about a young Native American boy named Lewis Blake living in the Tuscarora Indian Reservation in 1925.

Gansworth’s debut novel encompasses Lewis’ life and friendship with his friend George. You see through Lewis’ eyes the harsh treatment Native Americans get, the bullying and name-calling. But Lewis has some fun, too. He hangs out with his friend George and Uncle Albert. Lewis and George go to concerts and have fun. But George doesn’t know Lewis is a poor Indian, and their friendship is tested when the boys are forced to stay at Lewis’ home. All in all, the book is a good read, with its twists and turns. It’s meant for grades 6-9, but is good for older readers too. I would definitely recommend this book to anyone wanting a good read.

-Gautam

 

Teen Book Review: The Innocents

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innocentsThe Innocents by Lili Peloquin tells the story of two sisters; the more mature, shy and responsible Alice and the outgoing younger sister Charlie.  Their parents are divorced and their mom has just remarried a handsome, wealthy man named Richard.  The girls are moving to Richard’s enormous, luxurious house for the summer and this is where the story starts.  Upon arriving, they attend a partyand meet Cybill, Tommy and Jude.  Throughout the story, Alcie and Charlie discover that everyone in this town has a secret – and all of these secrets seem to be linked to the mysterious Camilla, their stepfather’s dead daughter.  Even their family has a hidden secret waiting to be found out.

This is basically a perfect girly book, it takes place in the summer and has romance and suspense in it.  It is also the  first in a series.  The second book will come out in the summer.  As far as age goes, I’d say this book is for ages 12 and up.  It was very enjoyable for me to read and I’d recommend it as a fun book.

-Gayatri

Summer Reading is on!

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Anyone from the area entering grades 6 through 12 next year can enter our Teen Summer Reading program.  Read 7 books, fill out the entry form and turn it in after July 15th to pick up a prize book.  One finisher will also win $100 in gift cards as well.  Other prizes include $25 Powell’s gift cards, vouchers for Blazers and Timbers games, Bullwinkle’s and Oaks Park passes and more. Programs for teens include geocaching, henna, gaming and more.  Check out all the details on our website.  Here is a Summer Reading video our Teen Library Council made to get people in the mood for Summer Reading.  Enjoy!

Teen Book Review: Different Girl

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different girlDifferent Girl by Gordon Dalquist tells the science fiction story of Veronika and 3 other girls who all live together on an island.  They have two adults who take care of them, Isobel and Robert.  As the book goes along, you can tell that there is a something very different about the 4 girls even though they seem to lead a regular life, they take a walk in the morning, help with lunch and go to school.  Later on, a girl named Mary washes ashore on the island, the lone survivor of a recent shipwreck.  Mary’s arrival spurs the girls to  question who they are and why they are on the island.

Personally, I didn’t really like this book, but it was interesting to read and put together the pieces for myself.  Because of this, I think it’s well written in that sense, but it was boring for me.  This book is appropriate for pretty much anyone in middle or high school and it seems like it is the first in a series.

-Gayatri

Teen Book Review: Anything But Ordinary

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anythingAnything but Ordinary by Lara Avery is the story of 17 year old diver, Bryce, who falls into a coma after hitting her head.  She is in the coma for five long years, missing high school graduation, Olympic trials, and college.  When she wakes up, strange things begin to happen to her.  She vividly remembers events that took lace while she was asleep, events she shouldn’t be able to remember.  She tries to make everything go back to normal – workout routines with her dad, hanging out with her best friend – but she begins to realize that the world she fell asleep in is not the same one in which she wakes up.  This one is for readers 12 and up.